NEGATIVE/NUCLEAR/PROLIFERATION

WE MUST ACCEPT NUCLEAR PROLIFERATION AND LEARN TO MANAGE IT

WE NEED A NEW MINDSET - MANAGING NUCLEAR PROLIFERATION, NOT JUST STOPPING IT

JOHN DEUTCH, FORMER CIA DIRECTOR, JULY 14, 1999, Federal News Service HEADLINE: PRESS CONFERENCE WITH SEN. ARLEN SPECTER (R-PA) // Inu-acs

These threats present a chilling challenge for the American people. It is beyond the threat of old proliferation where the only effort and the only problem facing the free community of nations was to impede the spread of the technology to other countries. We must realize today that that spread has occurred and is occurring.

PROLIFERATION IS COMING, AND OUR BEST APPROACH IS TO LEARN HOW TO MANAGE IT

Duncan Lennox, is Editor of Jane's Strategic Weapon Systems, Jane's Intelligence Review September 1, 1999 HEADLINE: Control regimes fail to stem the spread // Inu-acs

The last two years has seen India and Pakistan officially join the 'nuclear club'; it is possible that the next few years will see several more new members. It seems reasonable to assume that the list of countries reported or suspected of chemical and biological weapons research programmes is correct. A more straightforward approach would be to suggest that all countries should be aware of the dangers of these weapons and consider how best to handle them if used in their area. Any country that wants to acquire chemical or biological weapons could easily do so and the acquisition might not be known for some time.

PROLIFERATION IS INEVITABLE -- YOU CANNOT STOP THE SPREAD OF A TECHNOLOGY

Steven Mufson, Washington Post Staff Writer, The Washington Post July 17, 1999, Pg. A01 HEADLINE: Losing the Battle on Arms Control; Pakistan-India Nuclear Race Is Just Part of a Disturbing Trend //Inu-acs

Some diplomats feel the spread of nuclear weapons is inevitable. One former Defense Department official notes that all arms control efforts throughout history have failed, starting with a Vatican-sponsored conference in the 12th century to ban production of the crossbow, an import from China that could pierce the armor of European nobles. "There's a certain arrogance to say that you can stop the spread of technology," the official said.